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Cultural Event

Pete Seeger turns 100! All Hands on Deck to Sing the Highlander Center Back!

When: Friday, May 3, 2019, 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston
Pete Seeger turns 100! 
All Hands on Deck to Sing the 
Highlander Center Back!
 
Community Sing with Special Guests!
Friday May 3, 7:30 PM
Suggested Donation: $20+  
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“Reflections of a Retired Public School Teacher: My Greatest Fear—My Greatest Hope” with Larry Aaronson

When: Sunday, May 19, 2019, 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston
(No 11:00 AM Service) • Larry Aaronson is a retired school teacher from the City of Cambridge. He taught US history in different capacities for 30 plus years to a variety of students. Larry is a native of Washington, DC. He came of age during the civil rights era of the 1960s and was radicalized by Civil Rights stalwarts such as Marion Barry, H Rap Brown, among others. Larry’s early years and radicalization gave him the foundation to commit himself to public education and teaching young people to think critically about US history and society.
 
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“Boston Boy, A Greyhound Journey: A personal reflections on the rise of greyhound adoption and the impact of intense bullying.” with Louise Coleman

When: Sunday, May 12, 2019, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston
Discussion of how adopting one greyhound led to the formation of a nonprofit that saved thousands of dogs and the impact of bullying on the Founder and the organization.
 
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“Six Hour Day For Eight Hours Pay-The Shorter Work Day/Week” with John Proctor

When: Sunday, May 5, 2019, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston
Learn what we can do to reduce the forty-hour work week - There is a necessity for a shorter workday (six hours instead of eight). This “New Deal” is a demand to push a 30 Hour week to the Federal Government who would subsidize employment if market forces cannot. By self-initiating a mass movement towards achieving this goal, it will relieve overworked Americans who have no affiliation with identity politics to afford a better life at home and in their community.
 
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“Insurgent Supremacists: Confronting the U.S. Far Right” with Matthew N. Lyons

When: Sunday, April 28, 2019, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston
Antifascist researcher Matthew N. Lyons will speak about his recent book Insurgent Supremacists: The U.S. Far Right’s Challenge to State and Empire. This work examines a broad array for far right currents, from neonazis to Christian theocrats, and from the Patriot movement to the alt-right, looking at their development, politics, interactions, and impact on the wider political landscape. Matthew argues that these “insurgent supremacists” bolster established systems of oppression but also challenge the existing political order.
 
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Film & Discussion: "Where The Guns Go" with Maria Termini

When: Monday, March 25, 2019, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston

The so-called Drug War serves to make legal the killing and repression of people: the United States provides the weapons, while Mexico provides the people killed and disappeared. This documentary brings together the testimonies of human rights activists, journalists, and people in Mexico directly affected by the violence carried by both government forces and organized crime in Mexico, with U.S. support.

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"Parole in Massachusetts: Why We Need More Second Chances" with Jean Trounstine

When: Sunday, March 31, 2019, 11:00 am to 3:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston

The longer we keep people behind bars, the more we continue to fuel the engine of mass incarceration. Why then, is Massachusetts not paroling more people and supporting them to stay out of prison? What are the ways we could improve our ailing parole system? We must demand that more men and women serve the remainder of time in their communities?

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"Boston As I See It" with Sarah-Ann Shaw

When: Sunday, March 17, 2019, 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston

In 1968 • Sarah-Ann Shaw made her first television appearance on Say Brother (now known as Basic Black), a public affairs broadcast by Ray Richardson. After numerous appearances on the show, she was hired the following year by WBZ-TV as Boston’s first female African American reporter. A community activist for most of her life, Shaw worked on stories which provided positive images of urban life of Black, Asian, Latino and other communities of color in Massachusetts.

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“International Working Women’s Day” with Cindy Sheehan

When: Sunday, March 10, 2019, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston
This year’s Sacco/Vanzetti awardee. • Cindy Sheehan is a peace and social justice activist who garnered international attention after her son Casey died in the USA’s illegal and immoral war in Iraq in 2004. In August of 2005, Cindy set up a peace camp just yards from then president George Bush’s Crawford ranch to ask him, “for what noble cause” people were dying in Iraq and Afghanistan. She never got her answer, but thousands came to Crawford to join her and tens of thousands did solidarity actions all over the world.
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“Long Way Out - A Psychological Journey” with Nicole Waybright

When: Sunday, March 3, 2019, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston
“Long Way Out - A Psychological Journey” 
with Nicole Waybright
 
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“The Demise of the Evangelical Christian Church and the need for Multiracial Solidarity” with Edward Carson

When: Sunday, February 24, 2019, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston
The church — both the Negro church and the white church cannot fully reconcile their racial differences because at the heart of their differences exist capitalism. It was capitalism that transformed the Negro church after 1970 from an agent seeking radical change to one procuring materialism. And because churches love capitalism, they continue to fall short of being revolutionary change agents. Capitalism promotes racism and divides the Black and white working class from an achievable world. The white church fails at transforming the weak, poor, and oppressed in their space.
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“W. E. B. Du Bois Address: ‘The Problem of the Twenty First Century’” with Byron Rushing

When: Sunday, February 17, 2019, 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston
 
“W. E. B.  Du Bois Address: ‘The Problem of the Twenty First Century’” with Byron Rushing
 
A brief political and theological reflection on DuBois’s famous line a 118 years later.
 
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"Let them all in: Ending the Permanent Refugee Crisis" with Khury Petersen-Smith

When: Sunday, February 3, 2019, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston

The nightmare at the US’ southern border–thousands of stranded asylum seekers, detention camps for migrants, and a border patrol on the rampage–
is a horrifying slice of a global problem. Wars, economic disaster, and environmental devastation are displacing people all around the world. The US and
other states respond with violence, but we must build solidarity.

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“Honest to God, an Atheist’s Faith” with Rev. David Carl Olson

When: Sunday, January 27, 2019, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston

“Honest to God, an Atheist's Faith”
with Rev. David Carl Olson

I was once asked if I believe in God, and I had to say with all honesty, “Of course I believe in Poetry.” Still, when Mother Teresa encouraged me to “do something good for God,” I promised that I would. And I haven’t stopped.

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POSTPONED: “From the N word to colored to negro to black to Afro then African-American and right back to the N word or how we made blackness so irresistible that they tried to take it away from us: A Cultural Reflection on Living The Dream”

When: Sunday, January 20, 2019, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm
Where: Community Church of Boston • 565 Boylston Street, 2nd floor • Boston

Due to inclement weather this program has been postponed until April.

 

Using Ntozoke Shange’s "Spell #7", Talib Kweli’s "For Women", Arthur Jafa’s "Love is the Message, the Message is Death" and Dr. King’s "Letter from Birmingham a Jail", this sermonette explores the relationship between identity reclamation, liberation, and resistance.

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