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"The American Century" has plunged the world into crisis

‘The American Century’ Has Plunged the World Into Crisis

There’s something fundamentally wrong with U.S. foreign policy.

by Conn Hallinan and Leon Wofsy

Despite glimmers of hope — a tentative nuclear agreement with Iran, for one, and a long-overdue thaw with Cuba — we’re locked into seemingly irresolvable conflicts in most regions of the world. They range from tensions with nuclear-armed powers like Russia and China to actual combat operations in the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa.

Why? Has a state of perpetual warfare and conflict become inescapable? Or are we in a self-replicating cycle that reflects an inability — or unwillingness — to see the world as it actually is?

The United States is undergoing a historic transition in our relationship to the rest of the world, but this is neither acknowledged nor reflected in U.S. foreign policy. We still act as if our enormous military power, imperial alliances, and self-perceived moral superiority empower us to set the terms of “world order.”

While this illusion goes back to the end of World War II, it was the end of the Cold War and collapse of the Soviet Union that signaled the beginning of a self-proclaimed “American Century.” The idea that the United States had “won” the Cold War and now — as the world’s lone superpower — had the right or responsibility to order the world’s affairs led to a series of military adventures. It started with President Bill Clinton’s intervention in the Yugoslav civil war, continued on with George W. Bush’s disastrous invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, and can still be seen in the Obama administration’s own misadventures in Iraq, Syria, Libya, Yemen, and beyond.

In each case, Washington chose war as the answer to enormously complex issues, ignoring the profound consequences for both foreign and domestic policy. Yet the world is very different from the assumptions that drive this impulsive interventionism.

It’s this disconnect that defines the current crisis.

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People's History Teach in on Vietnam War - Report by Duncan McFarland and Thea Paneth

A teach-in on the history of the Vietnam War, with a focus on resistance, was held on March 28, 2015 at MIT. The program was organized by United for Justice with Peace, the eastern Massachusetts coalition formed after 9/11 and hosted by MIT's Technology and Culture Forum.

Veterans For Peace put out a national call for programs to accurately reflect the events of the period in response to a major Pentagon effort to officially rewrite history and sanitize that war as a propaganda campaign to justify current wars.

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Thoughts on an Orwellian Memorial Day

Pres. Obama celebrated May 25th as the"...the first Memorial Day in 14 years that the US is not engaged in a major ground war..." (my emphasis).

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Hiroshima & Nagasaki: 70 Years — Never Again!

A Call to Observe Hiroshima & Nagasaki Week in Massachusetts

August 6-9, 2015

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Transform Now Plowshares Three Freed!

Free!  Sister Megan Rice, Michael Walli and Greg Boertje-Obed have been released from prison for their Transform Now Plowshares action on July 28, 2012. 

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Standing with my people against the death penalty

I've used up some personal time this week to join the folks gathered down at Moakley Federal Courthouse in the morning to protest the death penalty as the trial enters its final stage.

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Peace & Planet Protest Demands Urgent Action on Nuclear Disarmament

Violence is a Religious Problem

Not all or even most of the violence in the world is religious in nature, but for religions to evolve and progress, for justice to be the order of the day, and for our planet to thrive, the religious and spiritually inclined among us are called on to take a stand for peace and non-violence.

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The Storm Is Over

 Kathy Kelly, co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence (www.vcnv.org) is nearing the end of a federal prison term incurred for participation in an anti-drone protest.

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UJP Recommits to the Struggle for Immigrant Rights

Sing Another Song

 Kathy Kelly, co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence (www.vcnv.org) is in federal prison for participation in an anti-drone protest. She can receive mail at: KATHY KELLY 04971-045; FMC LEXINGTON; FEDERAL MEDICAL CENTER; SATELLITE CAMP; P.O. BOX 14525; LEXINGTON, KY 40512.  

April 2, 2015

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Drone Protest at Park Street

A dozen activists braved the cold on the Boston Common March 21, 2015 to raise their voices against US drone warfare, on the 12th anniversary of the US invasion of Iraq, as part of the nation-wide "Spring Rising." 

They held photos of victims of drone attacks and told the stories of civilians caught up in a worldwide conflict with highly imprecise weapons. 

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ISIS: Then and Now

Origins and Future of ISIS

 Note: Prof. Elaine Hagopian’s talk on Dec. 10 at a UJP sponsored program covered the historical origins of the conflicts in the Middle East, and also much information on ISIS, which is presented here in summary.

View video at youtube.com/watch?v=MQsVBH4BkJ4

 ISIS developed out of Al-Qaeda in Iraq and is therefore one consequence of the US invasion and occupation starting in 2003.  Local Sunni tribes cooperated with the US during the “surge” or “Arab awakening” in 2007 fighting Al-Qaeda.   They expected to be rewarded by being part of the Iraqi government.  However, the Shia regime under Maliki pursued sectarian policies and imprisoned and killed Sunni leaders.   Al-Qaeda in Iraq was able to regroup and recruit Sunni support, and rebranded as  ISIS.  It grew into a decentralized but well organized group, with money from Saudis and captured US weapons including tanks.   

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Water is a Human Right!

WATER IS A HUMAN RIGHT! Was shouted over and over as a walking picket marched in front of the offices of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center.  

But Israel uses water as a tool of political oppression and dispossession:

• Israel appropriates Palestinian water resources for its own residents. Illegal West
Bank settlements fill their swimming pools while water taps in Palestinian villages and
refugee camps run dry for months at a time.

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