tpaneth's posts

Syria and the Peace Movement

Thea PanethOn Sunday, June 30, Phyllis Bennis of Institute for Policy Studies and Michael McPhearson of United for Peace and Justice met with Boston area peace activists to discuss the situation in Syria and what we can do.  

Phyllis Bennis began by saying she had come to Boston to attend the memorial for Charley Richardson, co-founder of Military Families Speak Out, the previous afternoon. She felt he would be glad that the very next day, peace activists from the Boston area were having a strategy session on the escalating situation in Syria.

Site Newsletter Sequence: 
0
Filed under:

Nonviolence Training Weekend - Report

Led by Cathy Hoffman and Ken Butigan, a weekend nonviolence training session was held in Cambridge for Campaign Nonviolence (http://paceebene.org/campaign-nonviolence).

The training brought local peace activists together with folks from Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, Worcester and Dighton, MA and one stalwart life-long activist from Baltimore, Maryland.

The weekend began with good coffee and an overview of the Campaign Nonviolence which invites people everywhere to: Practice active nonviolence toward themselves, all others and the world; Join in building a culture of active nonviolence; and Take nonviolent action connecting the dots between peace, economic justice and the environment.

Site Newsletter Sequence: 
0
Filed under:

Nuclear Power Crisis 2011: Citizens Appeal

Thea PanethI set my pen to paper with a heavy heart as events unfold in Japan at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants.  This is the third nuclear power catastrophe since I put on a backpack and walked down the access road at the site of the proposed Seabrook Nuclear power station on April 30, 1977. 

Three Mile Island, a reactor that had been on line 13 months, melted down in 1979.  If there had not been citizen action focused on calling nuclear technology into question that accident would have passed by unnoticed, as had other serious accidents in prior years.
 
The early days of the nuclear age were a time of conflict. My generation grew up during the war on Vietnam and has grown middle-aged and even old, watching conflicts harden in a nation that is fully committed to an unparalleled competitive materialism that walks hand in hand with the preparation for and waging of wars. 
Site Newsletter Sequence: 
0
Filed under:
Syndicate content