African-Americans Against the Bomb with Author Vincent Intondi

When: Monday, April 20, 2015, 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Where: Harvard University • Quincy Street (set back) • Sever Hall, Room 113 • Cambridge
2015 Apr 20 - 6:00pm
2015 Apr 20 - 8:00pm

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Seminar on Violence and Non-Violence
Vincent J Intondi on his new book, African Americans Against the Bomb: Nuclear Weapons, Colonialism, and the Black Freedom Movement

Introduction

Elaine Scarry
Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value, Harvard University

Cosponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center's Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Seminar on Violence and Non-Violence and the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research.

About the Presenter

Vincent Intondi is an Associate Professor of history and founder of the Center for Black Studies at Montgomery College in Washington, DC. Intondi is also Director of Research for American University¹s Nuclear Studies. He is regular contributor to the Huffington Post and author of the book, African Americans Against the Bomb: Nuclear Weapons, Colonialism, and the Black Freedom Movement.

About the Event

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UJP Recommits to the Struggle for Immigrant Rights

Vicky SteinitzBy Vicky Steinitz, UJP Cambridge

The UJP Planning Group has endorsed an immigrant rights campaign and seeks to strengthen ties with local  immigrant rights groups and the Mass Trust Act Coalition.   US foreign policy has generated the influx of immigrants, primarily from Latin America but increasingly from Africa and the Middle East. Proxy wars in places like El Salvador and Guatemala and  policies such as NAFTA created the conditions  that forced many to flee their countries. The detention and deportation of undocumented immigrants is a travesty that must be confronted by those of us who are committed to peace and justice.

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ISIS: Then and Now

Origins and Future of ISIS

 Note: Prof. Elaine Hagopian’s talk on Dec. 10 at a UJP sponsored program covered the historical origins of the conflicts in the Middle East, and also much information on ISIS, which is presented here in summary.

View video at youtube.com/watch?v=MQsVBH4BkJ4

 ISIS developed out of Al-Qaeda in Iraq and is therefore one consequence of the US invasion and occupation starting in 2003.  Local Sunni tribes cooperated with the US during the “surge” or “Arab awakening” in 2007 fighting Al-Qaeda.   They expected to be rewarded by being part of the Iraqi government.  However, the Shia regime under Maliki pursued sectarian policies and imprisoned and killed Sunni leaders.   Al-Qaeda in Iraq was able to regroup and recruit Sunni support, and rebranded as  ISIS.  It grew into a decentralized but well organized group, with money from Saudis and captured US weapons including tanks.   

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People's History Teach in on Vietnam War - Report by Duncan McFarland and Thea Paneth

A teach-in on the history of the Vietnam War, with a focus on resistance, was held on March 28, 2015 at MIT. The program was organized by United for Justice with Peace, the eastern Massachusetts coalition formed after 9/11 and hosted by MIT's Technology and Culture Forum.

Veterans For Peace put out a national call for programs to accurately reflect the events of the period in response to a major Pentagon effort to officially rewrite history and sanitize that war as a propaganda campaign to justify current wars.

This year is a commemorative year, the 50th anniversary of the first antiwar teach-in at the University of Michigan and the 40th anniversary of the end of the war in 1975.

Doug Rawlings, one of the six co-founders of Veterans For Peace started the day with a moving poem, Walking the Wall: “if your nightmares wait for the night, you are a survivor.”

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Water is a Human Right!

WATER IS A HUMAN RIGHT! Was shouted over and over as a walking picket marched in front of the offices of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center.  

But Israel uses water as a tool of political oppression and dispossession:

• Israel appropriates Palestinian water resources for its own residents. Illegal West
Bank settlements fill their swimming pools while water taps in Palestinian villages and
refugee camps run dry for months at a time.

• Israel has destroyed Palestinian wells, cisterns and irrigation and sewage systems and
prevented Palestinians from drilling new wells and irrigating their land.

• Tens of thousands of Palestinians do not have access to piped water and must pay up
to half their income to buy back their own water from tanker trucks.


What does this have to do with Massachusetts?

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Crosscurrents

This article first appeared on TeleSUR.  

Kathy Kelly, co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence (www.vcnv.org) is in federal prison for participation in an anti-drone protest. She can receive mail at: KATHY KELLY 04971-045; FMC LEXINGTON; FEDERAL MEDICAL CENTER; SATELLITE CAMP; P.O. BOX 14525; LEXINGTON, KY 40512.  

March 15, 2015 

By the time I leave Kentucky's federal prison center, where I'm an inmate with a 3 month sentence, the world's 12th-largest city may be without water. Estimates put the water reserve of Sao Paulo, a city of 20 million people, at sixty days. Sporadic outages have already begun, the wealthy are pooling money to receive water in tankers, and government officials are heard discussing weekly five-day shutoffs of the water supply, and the possibility of warning residents to flee. 

This past year United States people watched stunned as water was cut off, household by household, to struggling people in Detroit, less due to any total water shortage than to a drying up of any political power accessible to the poor in an increasingly undemocratic nation. A local privatization scheme left the city water department underfunded, while dictatorial "emergency management" imposed by the state chose to place the burden of repaying a corrupt government's bad debt on Detroit's most impoverished people. U.S. people were forced to remember the guarantee offered by the 
Universal Declaration of Human Rights, entered into as a treaty obligation by world nations after WWII, that access to water is an inalienable human right. All over the world, water scarcity is becoming a dire threat to the possibility of, as Prof. Noam Chomsky phrases it, decent human survival. 

Faced with such news, it is perhaps odd that I think of Professor Yang Yoon Mo, a South Korean activist I have met who, far from any area of drought, has fought instead, and with beautiful and irrepressible courage, to save a small lush rocky outcropping ringed by ocean, and with it both the shoreline, and the hopes for a peaceful future, of his home village. 

Professor Yang Yoon Mo

Professor Yang Yoon Mo

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